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Online Communities of Practice: A Catalyst for Faculty Development

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Abstract

This article addresses the concept of “communities of practice” and how it has come of age for the professional development of professors as teachers. Thanks to current technological options, faculty developers can enhance the opportunity for the entire faculty to learn through the use of online communities. Designing a faculty development portal using community of practice concepts can be an effective means to jump-start, facilitate, develop, and sustain faculty involvement in academic communities.

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Sherer, P.D., Shea, T.P. & Kristensen, E. Online Communities of Practice: A Catalyst for Faculty Development. Innovative Higher Education 27, 183–194 (2003). https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1022355226924

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1022355226924

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