Religion, Death Attitudes, and Belief in Afterlife in the Elderly: Untangling the Relationships

Abstract

The study investigated the relationship between religion, belief in afterlife, and death attitudes (death anxiety and death acceptance) in an elderly population using instruments with sound psychometric properties. Survey data was collected from 71 elderly participants. Results indicated a strong correlation between belief in afterlife and intrinsic religion, and differential statistically significant relationships between intrinsic religion and both death anxiety and death acceptance depending on whether the effects of belief in afterlife were partialed out. Findings were discussed in light of the absence of clinically meaningful results and, the role that belief in afterlife appears to play in the literature investigating religion and death anxiety.

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Falkenhain, M., Handal, P.J. Religion, Death Attitudes, and Belief in Afterlife in the Elderly: Untangling the Relationships. Journal of Religion and Health 42, 67–76 (2003). https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1022216828508

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  • religion
  • afterlife
  • death attitudes