Purpose and Performance of the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program

Abstract

The Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program is one of the most successful public programs designed to support small firm innovation. The purpose and structure of the program, however, are often misunderstood. This paper clarifies the goals and rationale for the SBIR program and reviews recent findings regarding the program's impact. The paper identifies five dimensions of the innovation capital gap and outlines a possible extension of the program to better address this finance gap.

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Cooper, R.S. Purpose and Performance of the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program. Small Business Economics 20, 137–151 (2003). https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1022212015154

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Keywords

  • Small Business
  • Industrial Organization
  • Public Program
  • Good Address
  • Innovation Research