Psychiatric Quarterly

, Volume 70, Issue 4, pp 289–301 | Cite as

Research on the Individual Placement and Support Model of Supported Employment

  • Robert E. Drake
  • Deborah R. Becker
  • Robin E. Clark
  • Kim T. Mueser

Abstract

This paper reviews research on the Individual Placement and Support (IPS) model of supported employment for people with severe mental illness. Current evidence indicates that IPS supported employment is a more effective approach for helping people with psychiatric disabilities to find and maintain competitive employment than rehabilitative day programs or than traditional, stepwise approaches to vocational rehabilitation. There is no evidence that the rapid-job-search, high-expectations approach of IPS produces untoward side effects. IPS positively affects satisfaction with finances and vocational services, but probably has minimal impact on clinical adjustment. The cost of IPS is similar to the costs of other vocational services, and cost reductions may occur when IPS displaces traditional day treatment programs. Future research should be directed at efforts to enhance job tenure and long-term vocational careers.

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc. 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert E. Drake
  • Deborah R. Becker
  • Robin E. Clark
  • Kim T. Mueser

There are no affiliations available

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