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Chromosome Research

, Volume 11, Issue 1, pp 57–64 | Cite as

Identification of chromosome rearrangements between the laboratory mouse (Mus musculus) and the Indian spiny mouse (Mus platythrix) by comparative FISH analysis

  • Kazumi Matsubara
  • Chizuko Nishida-Umehara
  • Asato Kuroiwa
  • Kimiyuki Tsuchiya
  • Yoichi Matsuda
Article

Abstract

Comparative chromosome painting was applied to the Indian spiny mouse (Mus platythrix) with mouse (M. musculus) chromosome-specific probes for understanding the process of chromosome rearrangements between the two species. The chromosome locations of the 5S and 18S-28S ribosomal RNA genes and the order of the 119 and Tcp-1 genes in the In(17)2 region of the t-complex were also compared. All the painting probes were successfully hybridized to the Indian spiny mouse chromosomes, and a total of 27 segments homologous to mouse chromosomes were identified. The comparative FISH analysis revealed that tandem fusions were major events in the chromosome evolution of the Indian spiny mouse. In addition, other types of chromosome rearrangements, i.e. reciprocal translocations and insertions, were also included.

chromosome homology chromosome painting comparative mapping Mus musculus Mus platythrix 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kazumi Matsubara
    • 1
  • Chizuko Nishida-Umehara
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Asato Kuroiwa
    • 2
  • Kimiyuki Tsuchiya
    • 4
  • Yoichi Matsuda
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Laboratory of Cytogenetics, Division of BioscienceGraduate School of Environmental Earth Science, Hokkaido UniversityKita-ku, SapporoJapan
  2. 2.Laboratory of Animal CytogeneticsCenter for Advanced Science and Technology, Hokkaido UniversityKita-ku, SapporoJapan
  3. 3.Chromosome Research Unit, Faculty of ScienceHokkaido UniversityKita-ku, SapporoJapan
  4. 4.Laboratory of Wild Animals, Department of Zootechnical Sciences, Faculty of AgricultureTokyo University of AgricultureAtsugi, KanagawaJapan

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