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The Personal Is the Political: Antecedents of Gendered Choices of Elected Representatives

Abstract

This article focuses on the legislative careers of women and men in state legislative office to explore how the relationship between the private and public spheres affects career opportunities, choices, perceptions, and actions. The findings indicate that the intersection of private and public is configured differently in the lives of women and men. Among other results, women were found to perform double duty, holding primary responsibility for the work of home and children even though they have the same public responsibilities as their male counterparts. The implications of these findings for individuals, public policy choices, institutional operations, and social patterns are explored.

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Thomas, S. The Personal Is the Political: Antecedents of Gendered Choices of Elected Representatives. Sex Roles 47, 343–353 (2002). https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1021431114955

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  • women in politics
  • women officeholder
  • women legislator