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Red light stimulates flowering and anthocyanin biosynthesis in American cranberry

Abstract

Morphological responses of American cranberry (Vacciniummacrocarpon Ait, Ericaceae) to different light conditions (red,far-red, white light and sunlight) were examined. Root growth and development,stem elongation, leaf enlargement, de-etiolation of stem and leaf, flower budformation, and flowering of American cranberry were measured under each lightcondition and in the dark. It was found that red light promotes development ofroots and leaves, flowering, and de-etiolation of stem and leaf of Americancranberry. Stem elongation and etiolation of stem and leaf were shown infar-redlight and dark. Anthocyanin biosynthesis as phytochemical response in cranberryplants was most sensitive to red light. Estimation of anthocyanin levels indifferent parts of cranberry plant suggested that anthocyanins were presentonlyin red fruit skins, and not in peeled fruits, green fruits, green leaves, greenstems, roots and seeds.

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Correspondence to Bal Ram Singh.

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Zhou, Y., Singh, B.R. Red light stimulates flowering and anthocyanin biosynthesis in American cranberry. Plant Growth Regulation 38, 165–171 (2002). https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1021322418740

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  • Anthocyanin
  • Cranberry
  • Flowering
  • Growth
  • Phytochrome
  • Red light