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In Search of Bandhood: Consultation with Original Music Groups

Abstract

Original music groups present a unique and under-explored example of self-initiated task groups. The intragroup life and negotiation of creative differences in three diverse original music groups from New York City were explored. Establishment of a shared group ideology and management of organizational tensions, identified in Murnighan and Conlon's study of professional string quartets, appeared central in the bands' cohesion. The role of group therapist, as a band consultant, was examined.

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Ferguson, H. In Search of Bandhood: Consultation with Original Music Groups. Group 26, 267–282 (2002). https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1021070431341

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  • creative process
  • creativity
  • performing artist groups
  • women's groups
  • rock bands
  • group ideology
  • conflict resolution
  • group consultant