Boundaries in the Doctor–Patient Relationship

Abstract

Boundaries in the doctor–patient relationshipis an important concept to help healthprofessionals navigate the complex andsometimes difficult experience between patientand doctor where intimacy and power must bebalanced in the direction of benefitingpatients. This paper reviews the concept ofboundary violations and boundary crossings inthe doctor–patient relationship, cautions aboutcertain kinds of boundary dilemmas involvingdual relationships, gift giving practices,physical contact with patients, andself-disclosure. The paper closes with somerecommendations for preventing boundaryviolations.

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Nadelson, C., Notman, M.T. Boundaries in the Doctor–Patient Relationship. Theor Med Bioeth 23, 191–201 (2002). https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1020899425668

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  • boundaries
  • boundary violations
  • doctor–patient relationship
  • ethics
  • professional misconduct