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Journal of Adult Development

, Volume 10, Issue 1, pp 13–22 | Cite as

An Exploratory Analysis of a Self-Assessed Wisdom Scale

  • Jeffrey Dean Webster
Article

Abstract

Three studies investigated the psychometric properties of the newly developed self-assessed wisdom scale (SAWS). Study 1 investigated the reliability of a 30-item questionnaire assessing 5 interrelated dimensions of wisdom. Results indicated the scale had good reliability (α = .78) and adequate factor structure. Study 2 demonstrated clear differences in people's implicit theories of wisdom using the SAWS: persons instructed to complete the measure according to their implicit theories of wisdom scored significantly higher (t = 9.40, p = .000) than persons completing the measure according to their implicit theories of foolishness. Study 3 demonstrated the construct validity of the SAWS by showing significant relationships between it and two independent measures thought to reflect aspects of wisdom, namely, generativity and ego integrity. Preliminary analyses of the SAWS suggests it has good initial reliability and validity. Suggestions for scale refinement and future research are examined.

positive aging implicit theories of wisdom generativity ego integrity validity 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jeffrey Dean Webster
    • 1
  1. 1.Psychology DepartmentLangara CollegeVancouverBritish Columbia, Canada V5Y 2Z6

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