Turkish and Moroccan couples and their first steps on the Dutch housing market: Co-residence or independence?

Abstract

The start of the housing career of Turkish andMoroccan married couples in the Netherlandsoften differs from the common experience ofnative Dutch couples. Many Turkish and Moroccancouples live with family, friends, orco-ethnics during the first years of theirjoint housing careers. It seems obvious torelate this to the cultural values brought fromthe mother country. It is however noteworthythat, in the Netherlands, Turks co-residemarkedly more often with family or friends thanMoroccans, while there is no substantialcultural difference between these two countriesof origin in this respect. It should,therefore, be stressed that co-residence isinfluenced not only by cultural preferences butalso by other factors, such as opportunitiesfor co-residence and housing marketconstraints.

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Bolt, G. Turkish and Moroccan couples and their first steps on the Dutch housing market: Co-residence or independence?. Journal of Housing and the Built Environment 17, 269–292 (2002). https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1020297016480

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  • cultural preferences
  • housing careers
  • living arrangements
  • Moroccans
  • The Netherlands
  • Turks