Advertisement

Argumentation

, Volume 16, Issue 3, pp 287–298 | Cite as

The Practice of Argumentative Discussion

  • David Hitchcock
Article

Abstract

I propose some changes to the conceptions of argument and of argumentative discussion in Ralph Johnson's Manifest Rationality (2000). An argument is a discourse whose author seeks to persuade an audience to accept a thesis by producing reasons in support of it and discharging his dialectical obligations. An argumentative discussion (what Johnson calls ‘argumentation’) is a sociocultural activity of constructing, presenting, interpreting, criticizing, and revising arguments for the purpose of reaching a shared rationally supported position on some issue. Johnson's theory of argumentative discussion, with occasional modifications, is derived from this definition as a sequence of 17 theorems. Argumentative discussion is a valuable cultural practice; it is the most secure route to correct views and wise policies.

argument argumentation argumentative discussion communication definition manifest rationality practice Ralph Johnson rhetoric 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

REFERENCES

  1. Aristotle: 1959, Ars Rhetorica, Clarendon Press, Oxford. (First published ca. 350 BCE.)Google Scholar
  2. Eemeren, Frans H. van and Rob Grootendorst: 1984, Speech Arts in Argumentative Discussions, Foris, Dordrecht.Google Scholar
  3. Eemeren, Frans H. van and Rob Grootendorst: 1992, Argumentation, Communication and Fallacies, Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Mahwah, NJ.Google Scholar
  4. Johnson, Ralph H.: 2000, Manifest Rationality: A Pragmatic Theory of Argument, Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Mahwah, NJ.Google Scholar
  5. Willard, Charles A.: 1983, Argumentation and the Social Grounds of Knowledge, University of Alabama Press, Tuscaloosa.Google Scholar
  6. Willard, Charles A.: 1989, A Theory of Argumentation, University of Alabama Press, Tuscaloosa.Google Scholar
  7. Wohlrapp, Harald: 1998, ‘A New Light on Non-deductive Argumentation Schemes’, Argumentation 12, 341–350.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • David Hitchcock
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PhilosophyMcMaster UniversityHamiltonCanada

Personalised recommendations