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Plant and Soil

, Volume 243, Issue 2, pp 173–186 | Cite as

Experimental and mathematical simulation of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria and plant interaction under cadmium stress

  • V.N. Pishchik
  • N.I. Vorobyev
  • I.I. Chernyaeva
  • S.V. Timofeeva
  • A.P Kozhemyakov
  • Y.V. Alexeev
  • S.M. Lukin
Article

Abstract

Bacterial inoculants of the commercially available plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) Arthrobacter mysorens 7, Flavobacterium sp. L30, and Klebsiella mobilis CIAM 880 were selected to obtain ecologically safe barley crop production on cadmium (Cd) polluted soils. All the PGPR immobilized 24–68% soluble cadmium from soil suspension. A. mysorens 7 and K. mobilis CIAM 880 were highly resistant to Cd and grew in up to 1 and 3 mmol CdCl2 on DAS medium respectively. All PGPR were able to fix nitrogen (276–1014 nmol mg−1 bacterial DW) and to produce indole acetic acid (IAA) (126–330 nmol mg−1 bacterial DW) or ethylene (4.6–13.5 nmol bacterial DW). All the PGPR actively colonized barley root system and rhizosphere and significantly stimulated root elongation of barley seedlings (up to 25%), growing on soil containing 5 or 15 mg Cd kg−1 of soil. Created in the simulation mathematical model confirms our hypothesis that PGPR beneficial effect on barley growing under Cd-stress is a complex process. One of mechanisms underlying this effect might be increase of bacterial migration from rhizoplane to rhizosphere, where PGPR bind soluble free Cd ions in biologically unavailable complex forms. Among the studied PGPR K. mobilis CIAM 880 was the most effective inoculant. Inoculation with K. mobilis CIAM 880 of barley plants growing on Cd contaminated soil (5 mg Cd kg−1 of soil) under field conditions increased by 120% grain yield and 2-fold decreased Cd content in barley grain. The results suggest that the using K. mobilis CIAM 880 is an effective way to increase the plant yield on poor and polluted areas.

barley Cadmium pollution commercially available PGPR bacteria mathematical model rhizosphere rhizoplane population dynamics 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • V.N. Pishchik
    • 1
  • N.I. Vorobyev
    • 1
  • I.I. Chernyaeva
    • 1
  • S.V. Timofeeva
    • 1
  • A.P Kozhemyakov
    • 1
  • Y.V. Alexeev
    • 2
  • S.M. Lukin
    • 3
  1. 1.All-Russian Research Institute for Agricultural Microbiology of Russian Academy of Agricultural SciencesPushkinRussia
  2. 2.Agrophysical Research Institute of Russian Academy of Agricultural ScienceRussia
  3. 3.All-Russian Institute of Organic Fertilizers and PeatVladimirRussia

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