The Contribution of Historically Black Colleges and Universities to the Preparation of African Americans for Faculty Careers

Abstract

This study uses the 1992 National Study of Postsecondary Faculty to explore the contribution of HBCUs to the preparation of African Americans for faculty careers. Descriptive analyses examine the characteristics of African American faculty who received their bachelor's and doctoral degrees from HBCUs. Logistic regression analysis is used to isolate the effects of receiving a bachelor's or a doctoral degree from an HBCU on research productivity, one measure of preparation, after controlling for background characteristics, undergraduate and graduate school experiences, current employment characteristics, and research activities. Ordinary least squares regression is used to isolate the effects of receiving a bachelor's or a doctoral degree from an HBCU on satisfaction with the work setting, a second measure of preparation, after controlling for other variables.

This is a preview of subscription content, access via your institution.

REFERENCES

  1. Anderson, E. F., and Hrabowski, F. A. (1977). Graduate school success of Black students from White colleges and Black colleges. Journal of Higher Education 48(3): 295-303.

    Google Scholar 

  2. Ayres, Q. W. (1982). Racial desegregation, higher education, and student achievement. Journal of Politics 44(2): 337-364.

    Google Scholar 

  3. Ayres, Q. W. (1983). Student achievement at predominantly White and predominantly Black universities. American Educational Research Journal 20(2): 291-304.

    Google Scholar 

  4. Ayres, Q. W., and Bennett, R. W. (1983). University characteristics and student achievement. Journal of Higher Education 54(5): 516-532.

    Google Scholar 

  5. Baird, L. L. (1990). The melancholy of anatomy: the personal and professional development of graduate and professional school students. In J. C. Smart (ed.), Higher Education: Handbook of Theory and Research, Vol. 6, pp. 361-392. New York: Agathon Press.

    Google Scholar 

  6. Blackburn, R. T., and Lawrence, J. H. (1995). Faculty at Work: Motivation, Expectation, Satisfaction. Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  7. Blackwell, J. E. (1988). Faculty issues: the impact on minorities. Review of Higher Education 11(4): 417-434.

    Google Scholar 

  8. Bohr, L., Pascarella, E. T., Nora, A., and Terenzini, P. T. (1995). Do Black students learn more at historically Black or predominantly White colleges? Journal of College Student Development 36(1): 75-85.

    Google Scholar 

  9. Braddock, J. H. (1981). Desegregation and Black student attrition. Urban Education 15(4): 403-418.

    Google Scholar 

  10. Bragg, A. K. (1976). The socialization process in higher education (ERIC/Higher Education Research Report No. 7). Washington, DC: American Association for Higher Education.

    Google Scholar 

  11. Brazziel, W. F. (1983). Baccalaureate college of origin of Black doctorate recipients. Journal of Negro Education 52(2): 102-109.

    Google Scholar 

  12. Cabrera, A. F. (1994). Logistic regression analysis in higher education: an applied perspective. In J. C. Smart (ed.), Higher Education: Handbook of Theory and Research, Vol. 10, pp. 225-256. New York: Agathon Press.

    Google Scholar 

  13. Clark, S. M., and Corcoran, M. (1986). Perspectives on the professional socialization of women faculty: a case of accumulative disadvantage? Journal of Higher Education 57(1): 20-43.

    Google Scholar 

  14. Corcoran, M., and Clark, S. M. (1984). Professional socialization and contemporary career attitudes of three faculty generations. Research in Higher Education 20(2): 131-153.

    Google Scholar 

  15. Fairweather, J. S. (1995). Myths and realities of academic labor markets. Economics of Education Review 14(2): 179-192.

    Google Scholar 

  16. Fairweather, J. S. (1996). Faculty Work and Public Trust: Restoring the Value of Teaching and Public Service in American Academic Life. Boston: Allyn and Bacon.

    Google Scholar 

  17. Fairweather, J. S. (1997). The highly productive faculty member: confronting the mythologies of faculty work. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for the Study of Higher Education.

  18. Feldman, D. C. (1976). A contingency theory of socialization. Administrative Science Quarterly 21: 433-452.

    Google Scholar 

  19. Fleming, J. (1984). Blacks in College: A Comparative Study of Student Success in Black and White Institutions. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

    Google Scholar 

  20. Freeman, K. E., Perna, L. W., and King, N. (1999). UNCF Statistical Report: 1998. Fairfax, VA: Frederick D. Patterson Research Institute.

    Google Scholar 

  21. Girves, J. E., and Wemmerus, V. (1988). Developing models of graduate student degree progress. Journal of Higher Education 59(2): 163-189.

    Google Scholar 

  22. Glassick, C. E., Huber, M. T., and Maeroff, G. I. (1997). Scholarship Assessed: Evaluation of the Professoriate. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

    Google Scholar 

  23. Hansen, W. L. (1988). Merit pay in higher education. In D.W. Breneman and T. I. K. Youn (eds.), Academic Labor Markets and Careers, pp. 114-137. New York: The Falmer Press.

    Google Scholar 

  24. Henderson, P. H., Clarke, J. E., and Woods, C. (1998). Summary Report 1996: Doctorate Recipients from United States Universities. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.

    Google Scholar 

  25. Kirshstein, R. J., Matheson, N., and Jing, Z. (1997). Instructional faculty and staff in higher education institutions: fall 1987 and fall 1992. Washington, DC: U.S. Depart-ment of Education, National Center for Education Statistics. (NCES 97-447)

    Google Scholar 

  26. Lewis, L. S. (1998). Scaling the Ivory Tower: Merit and Its Limits in Academic Careers, 2nd ed. New Brunswick, NJ: Transaction Publishers.

    Google Scholar 

  27. Martin, T. W., and Berry, K. J. (1969). The teaching-research dilemma: its sources in the university setting. Journal of Higher Education 40(9): 691-703.

    Google Scholar 

  28. Merton, R. K. (1988). The Matthew effect in science, II: cumulative advantage and the symbolism of intellectual property. Isis 79: 606-623.

    Google Scholar 

  29. National Center for Education Statistics. (1997). Digest of Education Statistics. Washington, DC: Author.

    Google Scholar 

  30. Nettles, M. T., and Perna, L. W. (1997). African American Education Data Book, Volume I: Higher and Adult Education. Fairfax, VA: Frederick D. Patterson Research Institute.

    Google Scholar 

  31. Nettles, M. T., Perna, L. W., and Freeman, E. C. (1999). Two Decades of Progress: African Americans Moving Forward in Higher Education. Fairfax, VA: Frederick D. Patterson Research Institute.

    Google Scholar 

  32. Nettles, M.T., Thoeny, A., and Gosman, E. (1986). Comparative and predictive analyses of black and white students' college achievement and experience. Journal of Higher Education 57(3): 289-318.

    Google Scholar 

  33. Pascarella, E. T. (1980). Student-faculty informal contact and college outcomes. Review of Educational Research 50(4): 545-595.

    Google Scholar 

  34. Pascarella, E. T. (1985). Racial differences in factors associated with bachelor's degree completion: a nine-year follow-up. Research in Higher Education 23(4): 351-373.

    Google Scholar 

  35. Pascarella, E. T., Smart, J. C., and Stoecker, J. (1989). College race and the early status attainment of Black students. Journal of Higher Education 60(1): 82-106.

    Google Scholar 

  36. Pascarella, E.T., and Terenzini, P.T. (1991). How College Affects Students: Findings and Insights from Twenty Years of Research. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

    Google Scholar 

  37. Pascarella, E. T., Whitt, E. J., Nora, A., Edison, M., Hagedorn, L. S., and Terenzini, P. T. (1996). What have we learned from the first year of the national study of student learning? Journal of College Student Development 37(2): 182-192.

    Google Scholar 

  38. Pearson, W., and Pearson, L. C. (1985). Baccalaureate origins of Black American scientists: a cohort analysis. Journal of Negro Education 54(1): 24-34.

    Google Scholar 

  39. Sax, L. J., Astin, A. W., Korn, W. S., and Mahoney, K. M. (1997). The American Freshman: National Norms for Fall 1997. Los Angeles: Higher Education Research Insti-tute, UCLA.

    Google Scholar 

  40. Solorzano, D. G. (1995). The doctorate production and baccalaureate origins of African Americans in the sciences and engineering. Journal of Negro Education 64(1): 15-32.

    Google Scholar 

  41. Southern Education Foundation. (1998). Miles to Go: A Report on Black Students and Postsecondary Education in the South. Atlanta, GA: Author.

    Google Scholar 

  42. Tack, M. W., and Patitu, C. L. (1992). Faculty job satisfaction: women and minorities in peril (ASHE-ERIC Higher Education Report No. 4). Washington, DC: George Washington University.

    Google Scholar 

  43. Thomas, G. E. (1981). College characteristics and Black students' four-year college graduation. Journal of Negro Education 50(3): 328-345.

    Google Scholar 

  44. Tierney, W. G., and Rhoads, R. A. (1993). Enhancing promotion, tenure and beyond: faculty socialization as a cultural process (ASHE-ERIC Higher Education Report No. 6). Washington, DC: George Washington University.

    Google Scholar 

  45. Turner, C. S. V., and Thompson, J. R. (1993). Socializing women doctoral students: minority and majority experiences. Review of Higher Education 16(3): 355-37.

    Google Scholar 

  46. Van Maanen, J., and Schein, E. H. (1979). Toward a theory of organizational socialization. In B. M. Staw (ed.), Research in Organizational Behavior, Vol. 1, pp. 209-264. Greenwich, CT: JAI Press Inc.

    Google Scholar 

  47. Wagener, U., and Nettles, M. T. (1998). It takes a community to educate students. Change, March/April: 18-25.

  48. Weiss, C. S. (1981). The development of professional role commitment among graduate students. Human Relations 34(1): 13-31.

    Google Scholar 

  49. Wenglinsky, H. (1997, August). Students at historically Black colleges and universities: their aspirations and accomplishments. Policy Information Report. Princeton, NJ: Educational Testing Service.

    Google Scholar 

  50. Wilson, R. (1994). The participation of African Americans in american higher education. In M. J. Justiz, R. Wilson, and L. G. Bjork (eds.), Minorities in Higher Education, Chapter 11. Phoenix: The Oryx Press.

    Google Scholar 

  51. Wolf-Wendel, L. E. (1998). Models of excellence: the baccalaureate origins of successful European American women, African American women, and Latinas. Journal of Higher Education 62(2): 141-186.

    Google Scholar 

Download references

Author information

Affiliations

Authors

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

About this article

Cite this article

Perna, L.W. The Contribution of Historically Black Colleges and Universities to the Preparation of African Americans for Faculty Careers. Research in Higher Education 42, 267–294 (2001). https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1018869922415

Download citation

  • college faculty
  • African Americans
  • black colleges
  • career preparation