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The Effects of Gender, Education, and Personal Skills Self-Confidence on Income in Business Management

Abstract

A pay disparity between men and women persists,especially in the higher echelons of the business world.This study investigates whether salaries in the businessmanagement field are affected by gender, hours worked, SAT score, college selectivity,college grades, an undergraduate degree in business,graduate degree attainment, leadership self-confidence,and social self-confidence. The sample consists of 941 men and women employed in businessmanagement; approximately 8% of this group are racialminority members. As anticipated, hours worked, collegeselectivity, college grades, a graduate degree, and leadership self-confidence are determinants ofincome. Most important is the finding that aftercontrolling for hours worked, education background, andself-confidence in personal skills, men still receive higher salaries than women.

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Tsui, L. The Effects of Gender, Education, and Personal Skills Self-Confidence on Income in Business Management. Sex Roles 38, 363–373 (1998). https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1018701704103

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Keywords

  • Income
  • Social Psychology
  • Business Management
  • Graduate Degree
  • High Salary