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Higher Education

, Volume 42, Issue 1, pp 85–105 | Cite as

The regulation of transnational higher education in Southeast Asia: Case studies of Hong Kong, Malaysia and Australia

  • Grant McBurnie
  • Christopher Ziguras
Article

Abstract

The millennium round of the General Agreement on Tradein Services (GATS) underlines issues relating to the regulationof education as an internationally traded service. Transnationaleducation is a key component of such trade. Southeast Asia issomething of a laboratory in the development and regulation oftransnational education. The region combines high demand, keencompetition among providers, and host country regulatory regimesranging from relatively laissez faire to strongly interventionist.This paper examines the approaches of three Southeast Asiangovernments – Hong Kong, Malaysia and Australia – to theregulation of transnational education within their borders. Ineach case the authors provide background on the higher educationsystem, describe the regulatory approaches to transnationaleducation, and analyse the motivations behind regulation. Boththe neoliberal approach of the WTO to trade in educationalservices, and critiques of this approach, are outlined. Theauthors conclude that any attempts to promote global standards orquality principles for transnational education must address themyriad concerns of governments, including consumer protection,advancing national goals and protecting the local system.

Australia consumer protection GATS Hong Kong Malaysia quality regulation trade in education services transnational education WTO 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Grant McBurnie
    • 1
  • Christopher Ziguras
    • 2
  1. 1.Office of International AffairsMonash UniversityAustralia
  2. 2.Monash Centre for Research in International EducationMonash UniversityAustralia

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