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Hydrobiologia

, Volume 446, Issue 1, pp 363–368 | Cite as

Effect of unionized ammonia, viscosity and protozoan contamination on reproduction and enzyme activity of the rotifer Brachionus rotundiformis

  • Adriana Belem de Araujo
  • Atsushi Hagiwara
  • Terry W. Snell
Article

Abstract

We determined the effect of environmental stressors on the physiological condition of Brachionus rotundiformis. For two morphologically distinct B. rotundiformis strains: Hawaii (average lorica length = 222 μm) and Langkawi strains (average lorica length 180 μm), neonates hatched from resting eggs were exposed to different levels of unionized ammonia (0.7–9.8 mg l−1), viscosity (relative viscosity against natural seawater = 1–1.17) and Euplotes sp. (protozoan) contamination (1–40 cells ml−1). Increasing stress decreased fecundity and lifespan of both rotifer strains. Glucosidase and phospholipase activities were correlated with reproductive responses of both the strains exposed to unionized ammonia. When culture water viscosity was changed, the activity of esterase and phospholipase was correlated with reproductive responses of the Hawaiian strain, and glucosidase activity was correlated with those of Langkawi strain.With the protozoan contamination, esterase and glucosidase activities were correlated only with reproductive responses of the Hawaiian strain, while activity of all three enzymes was correlated to those of the Langkawi strain. Glucosidase activity proved to be a reliable indicator of stress for cultured B. rotundiformis.

Rotifera Brachionus rotundiformis culture diagnosis environmental stress enzyme activity 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Adriana Belem de Araujo
    • 1
  • Atsushi Hagiwara
    • 2
  • Terry W. Snell
    • 3
  1. 1.Graduate School of Marine Science and EngineeringNagasaki UniversityNagasakiJapan
  2. 2.Faculty of FisheriesNagasaki UniversityNagasakiJapan
  3. 3.School of BiologyGeorgia Institute of TechnologyAtlantaU.S.A.

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