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Using Super's Career Development Assessment and Counselling (C-DAC) Model to Link Theory to Practice

  • Spencer G. Niles
Article

Abstract

Super's Career Development Assessment and Counselling Model (C-DAC)represents an excellent translation of career development theory intopractice. After decades of developing the various segments of his theory(i.e., developmental stages and tasks, life span, self-concept) toexplain career development, Super focused on using these theory segmentsto help individuals resolve their career concerns. This uniqueassessment-based intervention model is the result of a multinationalresearch effort directed toward understanding the individual'ssubjective and objective career development experience. This paperprovides a brief overview of the C-DAC model and then discusses how theC-DAC model is useful for addressing career concerns in the post-modernera.

Keywords

Developmental Stage Life Span Intervention Model Development Theory Career Development 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Spencer G. Niles
    • 1
  1. 1.Counselor Education ProgramPennsylvania State UniversityUSA

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