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Following Super's Heritage: Evaluation of a Career Development Program in Spain

  • Elvira Repetto
Article

Abstract

One of Super's most important contributions has been his emphasis onthe fact that careers develop over a life span. He proposed thatcounsellors measure career development through the construct ofvocational maturity, by identifying the coping methods used in facing avocational task at each chronological age. To complement the constructof maturation as the central process in adolescent career development hedevised measures of career maturity, such as the Career DevelopmentInventory – School Form (CDI-SF). Adopting an integratedperspective akin to Super and the specific concepts he identified ascomprising Career Maturity, the author reviewed recent advances inguidance and counselling theories to lay the theoretical foundations forthe design of her Career Development Program: Tu Futuro Profesional– TFP (Your Future Career). This article shows that, althoughthe concept of career maturity has its limitations, the CDI can be usedto measure the outcome of the Program – TFP and to evaluate itseffectiveness. This procedure was used in a pre-post-test research with4991 Spanish students from the 7th to 11th grade.

Keywords

Life Span Development Program Theoretical Foundation Central Process 11th Grade 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Elvira Repetto
    • 1
  1. 1.Departamento de Métodos de investigación y Diagnóstico en EducaciónUNED, Facultad de EducaciónMadrid

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