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Life Roles and Values in International Perspective: Super's Contribution through the Work Importance Study

  • Branimir Šverko
Article

Abstract

Launched in 1979, the Work Importance Study (WIS) put the finishingtouches to Super's lifework. WIS provides a richly cross-culturalexploration of peoples' life roles and values that people seek in theircareers and life in general. This major undertaking by a number ofresearchers from various countries could never have been successfullycompleted without Super's initiative and superb co-ordination. Theobjectives of this paper are to (1) describe the background,methodological approaches, and major results of the Work ImportanceStudy, in particular those that are relevant for career guidance andcounselling; (2) assess the project's international impact throughan analysis of its applications and further development in various partsof the world; and (3) mark out Super's role in promotinginternational co-operation and advancement of knowledge through thisunique collective endeavour.

Keywords

Methodological Approach Major Result International Perspective Career Guidance International Impact 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Branimir Šverko
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of ZagrebZagrebCroatia

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