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Endophytic fungi in leaves of Lycopersicon esculentum Mill

Abstract

Endophytic fungi were isolated from healthy tomato leaves from field-grown plants. Several surface-sterilization techniques were assayed for removing and killing epiphytes on tomato leaves. Surface-sterilization with an undiluted commercial solution of sodium hypochlorite was employed. To determine the spectrum of endophytes, samples were collected in February 1998 and 1999 from tomato plants (cultivar Tommy) cultivated in the experimental fields of Facultad de Ciencias Agrarias y Forestales, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Buenos Aires, Argentina. In general, different spectra of species were isolated in 1998 and 1999.Alternaria alternata was the fungus most frequently isolated from tomato leaves in 1999, but it was the second most common species in 1998. In contrast, Colletotrichum gloeosporioides was the fungus most frequently isolated in 1998, but it was not found in 1999. Species of other genera, such as Cladosporium and Penicillium, were isolated in both years.

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Larran, S., Mónaco, C. & Alippi, H. Endophytic fungi in leaves of Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. World Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology 17, 181–184 (2001). https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1016670000288

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  • Endophytic fungi
  • Lycopersicon esculentum
  • tomato leaves