Skip to main content

Brassica coenospecies: a rich reservoir for genetic resistance to leaf spot caused by Alternaria brassicae

We’re sorry, something doesn't seem to be working properly.

Please try refreshing the page. If that doesn't work, please contact support so we can address the problem.

Abstract

Development of leaf spot resistant mustard cultivars is a relevant objective in view of heavy crop losses caused by this pathogen. Thirty-eight species belonging to 9 genera, including cultivated and wild allies, of the genus Brassica were evaluated under epiphytotic conditions for two years. Inoculations were done on whole plants (in vivo) and on detached leaves (in vitro). Data on incubation period, number of lesions per leaf, lesion size and leaf area covered by lesions were recorded. Species which never produced disease symptoms throughout the growing period in pots and until 72 hours after inoculation in detached leaf assays during both years were treated as resistant, while those that produced symptoms were classified as moderately resistant, susceptible or highly susceptible depending upon incubation period, size of lesions and leaf area covered by disease symptoms. Eight species (Brassica desnottesii, Camelina sativa, Coincya pseuderucastrum, Diplotaxis berthautii, D. catholica, D. cretacea, D. erucoides, and Erucastrum gallicum) were found completely resistant, whereas others were classified as moderately resistant (12), susceptible (11) or highly susceptible (9). Since resistance is unavailable within the cultivated species, these 8 resistant wild species could be used as donor parents for introgressing resistance to leaf spot disease in Indian mustard.

This is a preview of subscription content, access via your institution.

References

  1. Awasthi, R.P. & S.J. Kolte, 1994. Epidemiological factors in relation to development and prediction of Alternaria blight of rapeseed and mustard. Ind Phytopathol 47: 395–399.

    Google Scholar 

  2. Browne, L.M., K.L Conn, W.A. Ayer & J.P. Tewari, 1991. The Camalexins: new phytoalexins produced in the leaves of Camelina sativa (Cruciferae). Tetrahedron 47: 3909–3914.

    Article  CAS  Google Scholar 

  3. Brun H., J. Plessis & M. Renard, 1987. Resistance of some crucifers to Alternaria brassicae (Berk.) Sacc. Proc. Seventh Int. Rapeseed Congr. Pozman, Poland, pp. 1222–1227.

    Google Scholar 

  4. Conn, K.L. & J.P. Tewari, 1986. Hypersensitive reaction induced by Alternaria brassicae in Eruca sativa, an oil-yielding crucifer. Can J Plant Pathol 8: 348 (Abstr.).

    Google Scholar 

  5. Conn, K.L., J.P. Tewari & J.S. Dahiya, 1988. Resistance to Alternaria brassicae and phytoalexins-elicitation in rapeseed and other crucifers. Plant Sci 56: 21–25.

    Article  CAS  Google Scholar 

  6. Conn, K.L. & J.P. Tewari, 1989. Interactions of Alternaria brassicae conidia with leaf epicuticular wax of canola. Mycol Res 93: 240–242.

    Google Scholar 

  7. Conn, K.L., J.P. Tewari & D. Hadziyev, 1984. The role of epicuticular wax in canola in resistance to Alternaria brassicae. Phytopathology 74: 851 (Abstr.).

    Google Scholar 

  8. Degenhardt, K.J., G.A. Petrie & R.A.A. Mosrall, 1982. Effects of temperature on spore germination and infection of rapeseed by Alternaria brassicae and A. raphani. Can J Plant Pathol 4: 115–118.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  9. Dubeck, J. & K. Degenhardt, 1975. Effect of leaf age and inoculum concentration on reaction of oilseed Brassica spp. to Alternaria brassicae. Phytopathlogy 65: 168 (Abstr.).

    Google Scholar 

  10. Habard, D.J., 1976. Cytotaxonomic studies of Brassica and related genera. In: J.G. Vaughan, A.J. Mcleod & B.M.G. Jones (Eds.), The Biology and Chemistry of the Cruciferae, pp. 47–68. Academic Press, London.

    Google Scholar 

  11. Hansen, L.H., 1998. Intertribal somatic hybridization between rapid cycling Brassica oleracea (L.) and Camelina sativa (L) Cranz. Euphytica 104: 173–179.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  12. Hansen, L.H. & E.D. Earle, 1995. Transfer of resistance to Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (L.) by protoplast fusion. Theor Appl Genet 91: 1293–1300.

    Article  CAS  Google Scholar 

  13. Hansen, L.H. & E.D. Earle, 1997. Somatic hybrids between Brassica oleracea (L.) and Sinapis alba (L.) with resistance to Alternaria brassicae (Berk.) Sacc. Theor Appl Genet 94: 1078–1085.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  14. Hong, C.X. & B.D.L. Fitt, 1995. Effect of inoculum concentration, leaf age and wetness period on the development of dark leaf and pod spot (Alternaria brassicae) on oilseed rape (Brassica napus). Annals Appl Biol 127: 283–295.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  15. Humpherson-Jones, F.M. & L.F. Ainsworth, 1982. Alternaria disease of Brassica seed crops. 1981 Annual Report of the National Vegetable Research Station, Wellesbourne, Warwick, UK, pp. 67.

    Google Scholar 

  16. Katiyar, R.K. & V.L. Chopra, 1990. Somaclonally induced earliness in Brassica juncea germplasm accession with field resistance to important diseases. Plant Breed 104: 262–264.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  17. Kolte, S.J, 1985. Diseases of Annual Edible Oilseed Crops. Vol. 2–3. CRC Press, Boca Raton, Florida, U.S.A., pp. 135.

    Google Scholar 

  18. Kolte, S.J., R.P. Awasthi & Vishwanath, 1987. Assessment of yield losses due to Alternaria blight in rapeseed and mustard. Ind Phytopathol 40: 209–211.

    Google Scholar 

  19. Narasimhulu, S.B., P.B. Kirti, S.R. Bhat, S. Prakash & V.L. Chopra, 1994. Intergeneric protoplast fusion between Brassica carinata and Camelina sativa. Plant Cell Rep 13: 657–660.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  20. Ripley, V., M. Thorpe, S. Iler, K. Mizier & W.D. Beversdorf, 1992. Isozyme analysis as a tool for introgression of Sinapis alba germ plasm into Brassica napus. Theor Appl Genet 84: 403–410.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  21. Saharan, G.S. & A.K. Kadian, 1983. Analysis of components of horizontal resistance in rapeseed and mustard cultivars against Alternaria brassicae. Ind Phytopathol 36: 503–507.

    Google Scholar 

  22. Sharma, T.R. & B.M. Singh, 1992. Transfer of resistance to Alternaria brassicae in Brassica juncea through interspecific hybridization among Brassica. J Genet Breed 46: 373–378.

    Google Scholar 

  23. Sharma, T.R. & B.M. Singh, 1995. Generation and evaluation of somaclones of Brassica juncea for resistance to Albugo candida and Alternaria brassicae. Proc. Ind. Nat. Sci. Acad. B61, pp. 155–162.

    Google Scholar 

  24. Sigareva, M.A. & E.D. Earle, 1999. Camalexin induction in intertribal somatic hybrids between Camelina sativa and rapidcycling Brassica oleracea. Theor Appl Genet 98: 164–170.

    Article  CAS  Google Scholar 

  25. Skoropad, W.P. & J.P. Tewari, 1977. Field evaluation of the role of epicuticular wax in rapeseed and mustard in resistance to Alternaria brassicae. Can J Plant Sci 57: 1001–1003.

    Google Scholar 

  26. Tewari, J.P., 1986. Subcuticular growth of Alternaria brassicae in rapeseed. Can J Bot 64: 1227–1231.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  27. Tewari, J.P., 1991. Structural and biochemical bases of the black spot diseases of crucifers. Adv Struc Biol 1: 25–34.

    Google Scholar 

  28. Tewari, J.P. & K.L. Conn, 1993. Reactions of some wild crucifers to Alternaria brassicae. Bulletin-OILS-SROP 16: 53–58.

    Google Scholar 

  29. Tewari, J.P. & W.P. Skoropad, 1976. Relationship between epicuticular wax and blackspot caused by Alternaria brassicae to three lines of rapeseed. Can J Plant Sci 64: 781–785.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  30. Vishwanath & S.J. Kolte, 1999. Methods of inoculation for resistance to Alternaria blight of rapeseed and mustard. J Mycol & Plant Pathol 29: 96–99.

    Google Scholar 

  31. Warwick, S.I., 1993. Wild species in the tribe Brassicaceae (Cruciferae) as sources of agronomic traits. Part IV In: Guide to the Wild Germplasm of Brassica and Allied Crops. Technical Bull. 1993-17E, Center Land and Biological Resources Research, Research Branch, Agriculture Canada, pp. 1–19.

    Google Scholar 

  32. Westman, A.L., S. Kresovich & M.H. Dickson, 1999. Regional variation in Brassica nigra and other weedy crucifers for disease reaction to Alternaria brassicicola and Xanthomonas campestris pv. Campestris. Euphytica 106: 253–259.

    Article  Google Scholar 

Download references

Author information

Affiliations

Authors

Corresponding author

Correspondence to V.L. Chopra.

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

About this article

Cite this article

Sharma, G., Dinesh Kumar, V., Haque, A. et al. Brassica coenospecies: a rich reservoir for genetic resistance to leaf spot caused by Alternaria brassicae. Euphytica 125, 411–417 (2002). https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1016050631673

Download citation

  • Alternaria brassicae
  • Alternaria resistance
  • Brassica
  • in vivo and in vitro evaluation of resistance
  • wild species
  • Indian mustard