Types of Knowledge and Their Roles in Technology Transfer

Abstract

At the dawn of a new millennium, the most valuable global commodity is knowledge, particularly new knowledge about technology that may give a culture, a company and/or a laboratory an advantage. This paper begins with examples of tacit technology transfer, including atomic weapons technology, whose development suggests that failure to preserve tacit knowledge could lead to uninvention. This discussion is followed by a taxonomy of knowledge, distinguishing between four types--information, skills, judgement and wisdom. These types are used to refine the distinction between tacit and explicit knowledge, including their role in teams.

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Gorman, M.E. Types of Knowledge and Their Roles in Technology Transfer. The Journal of Technology Transfer 27, 219–231 (2002). https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1015672119590

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Keywords

  • Economic Growth
  • Technology Transfer
  • Industrial Organization
  • Tacit Knowledge
  • Atomic Weapon