Gender-Role Variables and Attitudes Toward Homosexuality

Abstract

Two studies examined the relationships of gender-role variables to attitudes toward homosexuality. Study 1, a meta-analysis, found that endorsement of traditional gender-role beliefs, modern sexism, and hypermasculinity were related to attitudes, but that gender-role self-concept was not. Study 2 examined the relationships of endorsement of male role norms, attitudes toward women, hostile sexism, benevolent sexism, modern sexism, hypermasculinity, and hyperfemininity to attitudes toward homosexuality and self-reported antigay behaviors in a college student sample. The best predictors of attitudes were participant gender, endorsement of male role norms, attitudes toward women, benevolent sexism, and modern sexism. The best predictors of antigay behavior were participant gender and hyper-gender-role orientation; attitudes toward women and modern sexism were also predictors for men but not for women.

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Whitley, B.E. Gender-Role Variables and Attitudes Toward Homosexuality. Sex Roles 45, 691–721 (2001). https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1015640318045

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  • gender roles
  • attitudes toward homosexuality
  • anti-gay behavior
  • meta-analysis