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Do Life-Saving Regulations Save Lives?

Abstract

Life-saving regulations may be counter-productive since they have an indirect mortality effect through the reduction in disposable income. This paper estimates the effect of income on mortality, controlling for the initial health status and a host of personal characteristics. The analysis is based on a random sample of the adult Swedish population of over 40,000 individuals followed up for 10–17 years. The income loss that will induce an expected fatality is estimated to be $6.8 million when the costs are borne equally among all adults, $8.4 million when the costs are borne proportionally to income and $9.8 million when the costs are borne progressively to income.

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Correspondence to Ulf-G. Gerdtham.

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Gerdtham, UG., Johannesson, M. Do Life-Saving Regulations Save Lives?. Journal of Risk and Uncertainty 24, 231–249 (2002). https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1015635518824

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1015635518824

  • regulations
  • risk-risk analysis
  • mortality
  • income
  • duration models