The Atlantic forest in the Volta Velha Reserve: a tropical rain forest site outside the tropics

Abstract

With its very broad latitudinal extension (from 5° to 30°S), Brazil's Atlantic Rain Forest includes sites that wouldnot be classified as tropical by commonly used climatic classificationsystems. This situation particularly holds for the sites nearthe southern limits of this ecosystem. The goal of this study was to assess forest floristic composition, physiognomic aspects (deciduousspecies, leaf types, leaf area index) and reproductive biology (monoecious/dioeciousspecies, pollination syndromes and dispersal syndromes) of the Atlantic forest in the Volta VelhaReserve, southern Brazil (26°04′ S, 48°38′ W Gr). The research focuses on theaffinities of this site, which lies outside generally accepted boundaries for tropical forest. Theresults demonstrate that Volta Velha has a typically tropical floristic composition, apparentlymaintained by local climatic conditions. The differences between the characteristics of the VoltaVelha forest and those of other tropical stands are within the range of differences observed amongclassically defined tropical sites.

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Negrelle, R.R. The Atlantic forest in the Volta Velha Reserve: a tropical rain forest site outside the tropics. Biodiversity and Conservation 11, 887–919 (2002). https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1015322414513

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  • Atlantic lowland rain forest physiognomy
  • Floristic survey
  • Reproductive biology
  • Tropical diversity
  • Tropical rain forest