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Issues in Parent-Child Agreement: The Case of Structured Diagnostic Interviews

  • Amie E. Grills
  • Thomas H. Ollendick
Article

Abstract

There are three primary purposes of this review. First, the review distinguishes among three types of reliability and describes the importance of evaluating the reliability of child psychopathology assessment instruments for clinical practice and research. Second, parent-child reliability findings from 5 of the more carefully studied and frequently used Structured (semi and highly) diagnostic interviews (The Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School-age Children, The Child Assessment Scale, The Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule for Children. The Diagnostic Interview for Children and Adolescents, and the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children) are examined. Finally, this review explores factors that have been implicated in terms of their potential effect on parent-child agreement. In addition, future directions for research and clinical practice within this area are identified and potential resolutions to the conundrum of parent-child discordance are discussed.

parent-child agreement multiple informant reliability Structured Diagnostic Interviews 

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© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Amie E. Grills
    • 1
  • Thomas H. Ollendick
    • 1
  1. 1.Child Study Center, Department of PsychologyVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State UniversityBlacksburg

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