Community Mental Health Journal

, Volume 38, Issue 2, pp 95–110 | Cite as

Beneficence vs. Obligation: Challenges of the Americans with Disabilities Act for Consumer Employment in Mental Health Services

  • Linda E. Francis
  • Paul W. Colson
  • Pamela Mizzi
Article

Abstract

Involvement of mental health service consumers in the provision of mental health services is a growing model in community mental health. It is, however, a complicated issue, made ever more so by the passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act. In this ethnographic case study, we seek to explore the changes one social services agency has made to adjust to the requirements of the ADA and the impact of these changes on their consumer employees. Our results indicate potential for positive progress as a result of the ADA, but also unexpected pitfalls as organizational cultures change as well.

consumer staff ADA mental health services 

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc. 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Linda E. Francis
    • 1
  • Paul W. Colson
  • Pamela Mizzi
  1. 1.School of Social Welfare, Health Sciences CenterSUNYStony Brook

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