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Secondary traumatic stress among trauma counsellors: What does the research say?

Abstract

Although posttraumatic stress theory has beenextensively developed in the psychological andmedical literature in the last decade,development of secondary traumatic stresstheory is still in its infancy. Thetraumatology literature reveals a focus on thetraumatized victims and, with few exceptions,excludes those who are secondarily traumatizedthrough their counselling work with survivorsof traumatic life events. Claims have recentlybeen made that counsellors working in the fieldof trauma are vulnerable and at risk fordeveloping trauma symptoms similar to thoseexperienced by traumatized clients. The authorreviews the recent research and literature onsecondary traumatic stress and addresses theimplications of these research findings tocounsellor educators and practitioners workingin the field of trauma.

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Arvay, M.J. Secondary traumatic stress among trauma counsellors: What does the research say?. International Journal for the Advancement of Counselling 23, 283–293 (2001). https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1014496419410

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Keywords

  • Research Finding
  • Posttraumatic Stress
  • Traumatic Stress
  • Traumatic Life
  • Trauma Symptom