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Journal of Nonverbal Behavior

, Volume 26, Issue 1, pp 3–25 | Cite as

The Effect of Social Presence on the Facial and Verbal Expression of Emotion and the Interrelationships Among Emotion Components

  • Victoria LeeEmail author
  • Hugh Wagner
Article

Abstract

Women were videotaped while they spoke about a positive and a negative experience either in the presence of an experimenter or alone. They gave self-reports of their emotional experience, and the videotapes were rated for facial and verbal expression of emotion. Participants spoke less about their emotions when the experimenter (E) was present. When E was present, during positive disclosures they smiled more, but in negative disclosures they showed less negative and more positive expression. Facial behavior was only related to experienced emotion during positive disclosure when alone. Verbal behavior was related to experienced emotion for positive and negative disclosures when alone. These results show that verbal and nonverbal behaviors, and their relationship with emotional experience, depend on the type of emotion, the nature of the emotional event, and the social context.

nonverbal behavior emotion social presence facial expression verbal expression 

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc. 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.National Primary Care Research and Development CentreManchesterUK
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyUniversity of Central LancashireUK

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