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Using Trade Incentives to Promote Customer Relationships in a Retail Setting

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Journal of Market-Focused Management

Abstract

Suppliers and retailers use a variety of techniques designed to motivate salespeople to engage in specific selling behaviors that will provide results that will assist in achieving either the supplier's or retailer's goals. One method that is commonly applied is the sales incentive. This research examines popular forms of incentives to assess the relationships that exist between the incentives offered and salesperson behaviors. The study also examines the types of incentives commonly used by both suppliers and retailers and salesperson perceptions of these incentives. To accomplish this, 95 salespeople working for a major automotive parts company responded to questions designed to assess their attitudes and behaviors toward incentives. The results provide information which may be valuable to manufacturers, retailers, and academicians as they investigate the use of incentive based compensation programs and sales force behavior.

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Parker, R.S., Pettijohn, L.S. & Pettijohn, C.E. Using Trade Incentives to Promote Customer Relationships in a Retail Setting. Journal of Market-Focused Management 5, 135–147 (2002). https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1014096027088

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