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Micropropagation and field evaluation of micropropagated plants of turmeric

Abstract

A protocol was developed for in vitro propagation of turmeric cv `elite' using young vegetative buds from sprouting rhizomes. The shoot buds produced multiple shoots when cultured on MS solid medium supplemented with benzyladenine and 1-naphthalene acetic acid. The effect of various cytokinins on shoot multiplication was studied by culturing the shoot tips on MS liquid medium supplemented with benzyladenine, benzyladenine riboside, kinetin, kinetin riboside, zeatin, 6-γ,γ-dimethylallylaminopurine, adenine, adenine sulfate or metatopolin each at 10 μM in combination with 1-naphthalene acetic acid (1 μM). Significant differences were observed between the treatments. Liquid medium was more favourable than agar medium for shoot multiplication. Among the various concentrations of agar tested, 0.4% and 0.6% were the best and produced the highest number of shoots per explant. Among the different carbohydrates tested, sucrose, fructose, glucose, sugar cubes, maltose, levulose and market sugar were found to be equally effective for shoot multiplication and xylose, rhamnose, lactose and soluble starch were inhibitory. Ninety five percent of the micropropagated plants survived in sterilized soil in paper cups and all of them survived in the field. Among 48 plants, two plants showed variegated leaves on the tillers. The micropropagated plants showed a significant increase in shoot length, number of tillers, number and length of leaves, number of fingers and total fresh rhizome weight per plant when compared with conventionally propagated plants. RAPD analysis of 11 regenerated plants using sixteen 10-mer primers did not show any polymorphism.

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Correspondence to Susan Eapen.

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Salvi, N.D., George, L. & Eapen, S. Micropropagation and field evaluation of micropropagated plants of turmeric. Plant Cell, Tissue and Organ Culture 68, 143–151 (2002). https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1013889119887

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1013889119887

  • carbohydrates
  • Curcuma longa
  • cytokinins
  • RAPD analysis
  • shoot tip culture
  • Zingiberaceae