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Asian gangs in the United States: The current state of the research literature

Abstract

Since the late 1980s, criminologists have been interestedin analyzing Asian gangs. Despite the rather sharp increasein books and articles published on the subject in the1990s, there appears to exist no consensus on the nature and etiologyof Asian gangs. This paper describes the current state ofresearch on Asian gangs and assesses whether or not thereis a dominant criminological theory on their cause. Itcompares and contrasts African American and Asian gangs,and closes with research and policy recommendations.

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Tsunokai, G.T., Kposowa, A.J. Asian gangs in the United States: The current state of the research literature. Crime, Law and Social Change 37, 37–50 (2002). https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1013394320338

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Keywords

  • Research Literature
  • International Relation
  • Policy Recommendation
  • Criminological Theory
  • Asian Gang