Max Weber and the Sociology of Music

Abstract

The sociology of music has been an area largely left to European sociologists. In an effort to generate greater domestic interest in the field, an examination of Max Weber's methodology and an update to his study of music is proposed. Fewer occupations or cultural projects are more social than making music, and the domestic sociological community's absence from the debate is deplorable given the dominant position our country possesses regarding musical production. Weber's Sociology of Music, which combines urban theory, class/labor theory, rationalization theory, and even climatic changes, is an excellent place to begin a thorough discussion of the social components of music. Our present understanding of cultural theories, urban theories, and Habermas's Communicative Action Theory can be employed to improve on Weber's theory; toward a new approach for the study of the sociology of music.

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Turley, A.C. Max Weber and the Sociology of Music. Sociological Forum 16, 633–653 (2001). https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1012833928688

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  • sociology of music
  • Max Weber
  • Jurgen Habermas
  • urban music
  • rationalization theory