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Systemic Practice and Action Research

, Volume 14, Issue 5, pp 615–649 | Cite as

Unfolding a Theory of Systemic Intervention

  • Gerald Midgley
  • Alejandro E. Ochoa-Arias
Article

Abstract

This paper interrogates four perspectives (structuralist community psychology, deconstruction, interpretive systemology, and critical systems thinking) to inform the unfolding of a theory of systemic intervention. A vision of epistemology is provided which clarifies the relationships among knowledge, power, will and intervention, and a normative framework for systemic intervention is then presented. Finally, the theory unfolded in this paper is deconstructed to reveal a second theory, yet to be explored, of systemic life projects. This provides an exciting agenda for future research.

systemic intervention systems theory systems philosophy epistemology systems practice critical systems thinking interpretive systemology community psychology deconstruction life projects 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gerald Midgley
    • 1
  • Alejandro E. Ochoa-Arias
    • 2
  1. 1.Centre for Systems Studies, Business SchoolUniversity of HullHullUK
  2. 2.Centro de Investigaciones en Sistemologia Interpretativa, Faculty of EngineeringUniversity of Los AndesMéridaVenezuela

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