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Three worlds of instructional design: State of the art and future directions

Abstract

Three worlds of ID are distinguished. The Worldof Knowledge stresses the analysis of learningoutcomes in knowledge structures and theselection of instructional strategies forparticular outcomes; the World of Learningfocuses on particular learning processes andthe synthesis of strategies that support thoseprocesses; the World of Work focuses onreal-life task performance and strategies thatsupport learners while they work on authenticproblems. Contributions to this Special Issueare discussed within the three-world framework.Implications for future research are discussed,stressing the promise of mental models as atheoretical construct that may help to buildbridges between the three worlds.

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van Merriënboer, J.J., Kirschner, P.A. Three worlds of instructional design: State of the art and future directions. Instructional Science 29, 429–441 (2001). https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1011904127543

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1011904127543

  • cognitivism
  • constructivism
  • instructional design
  • instructional methods
  • learning
  • mental models