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Induction of Systemic Resistance in Cucumber against Several Diseases by Plant Growth-promoting Fungi: lignification and Superoxide Generation

Abstract

Five fungal isolates (Trichoderma, Fusarium, Penicillium, Phoma and a sterile fungus) from zoysiagrass rhizosphere that promote plant growth were tested for their ability to induce systemic resistance in cucumber plants against Colletotrichum orbiculare. Roots of cucumber plants were treated with these fungal isolates using barley grain inocula (BGI), mycelial inocula (MI) or culture filtrate (CF). Most isolate/inoculum form combinations significantly reduced the disease except BGI of Trichoderma. These fungal isolates were also evaluated for induction of systemic resistance against bacterial angular leaf spot and Fusarium wilt by treatment with BGI. Penicillium, Phoma and the sterile fungus significantly reduced the disease incidence of bacterial angular leaf spot. Phoma and sterile fungus protected plants significantly against Fusarium wilt. Roots treated with CFs of these fungal isolates induced lignification at Colletotrichum penetration points indicating the presence of an elicitor in the CFs. The elicitor activity of CFs was evaluated by the chemiluminescence assay using tobacco callus and cucumber fruit disks. The CFs of all isolates elicited conspicuous superoxide generation. The chemiluminescence activity of the CF of Penicillium was extremely high, and its intensity was almost 100-fold higher than that of other isolates. The chemiluminescence activity was not lost following treatment with protease or autoclaving or after removal of lipid. The MW 12,000 dialyzed CF fraction was highly effective in eliciting chemiluminescence activity. Chemiluminescence emission from cucumber fruit disks treated with Penicillium was the same as that obtained from tobacco callus, except that the lipid fraction also showed a high activity. Both the MW 12,000 fraction and the lipid fraction induced lignification in the epidermal tissues of cucumber hypocotyls.

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Correspondence to Mitsuro Hyakumachi.

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Koike, N., Hyakumachi, M., Kageyama, K. et al. Induction of Systemic Resistance in Cucumber against Several Diseases by Plant Growth-promoting Fungi: lignification and Superoxide Generation. European Journal of Plant Pathology 107, 523–533 (2001). https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1011203826805

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1011203826805

  • induced systemic resistance
  • plant growth-promoting fungi
  • cucumber
  • lignification
  • superoxide generation