The Review of Austrian Economics

, Volume 14, Issue 2–3, pp 193–207

Typicality and Novelty: Schütz and Shackle on the Paradox of Choice

  • Mie Augier
Article

Abstract

This paper discusses the thoughts of the Austrian/American phenomenologist Alfred Schütz (1899–1959) and the British economist George Shackle (1903–1992) and their views on choice, which are in many ways very different, perhaps even inconsistent, but also complementary and may even have some shared elements. This is in particular so with regard to the problem of the paradox of choice, the overall insight that for choice to be informative, it must neither be predetermined nor random. Shackle has mainly focused on the creative aspect—on how choice originates while Schütz has tended to focus more on how people are able to make non-random choices by referring to the “typical” features of action. The paper argues that there are many differences Schütz and Shackle. The possibility that they are complementary approaches is indicated.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mie Augier
    • 1
  1. 1.Stanford UniversityStanford

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