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Social Indicators Research

, Volume 55, Issue 3, pp 241–302 | Cite as

A New Measure of Quality of Work Life (QWL) Based on Need Satisfaction and Spillover Theories

  • M. Joseph Sirgy
  • David Efraty
  • Phillip Siegel
  • Dong-Jin Lee
Article

Abstract

A new measure of QWL was developed based on need satisfaction and spillover theories. The measure was designed to capture the extent to which the work environment, job requirements, supervisory behavior, and ancillary programs in an organization are perceived to meet the needs of an employee. We identified seven major needs, each having several dimensions. These are: (a) health and safety needs (protection from ill health and injury at work and outside of work, and enhancement of good health), (b) economic and family needs (pay, job security, and other family needs), (c) social needs (collegiality at work and leisure time off work), (d) esteem needs (recognition and appreciation of work within the organization and outside the organization), (e) actualization needs (realization of one's potential within the organization and as a professional), (f) knowledge needs (learning to enhance job and professional skills), and (g) aesthetic needs (creativity at work as well as personal creativity and general aesthetics). The measure's convergent and discriminant validities were tested and the data provided support to the construct validity of the QWL measure. Furthermore, the measure's nomological (predictive) validity was tested through hypotheses deduced from spillover theory. Three studies were conducted – two studies using university employees and the third using accounting firms. The results from the pooled sample provided support for the hypotheses and thus lent some support to the nomological validity to the new measure.

Keywords

Construct Validity Work Environment Discriminant Validity Pool Sample Work Life 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Joseph Sirgy
    • 1
  • David Efraty
    • 1
  • Phillip Siegel
    • 1
  • Dong-Jin Lee
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of MarketingVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Pamplin College of BusinessBlacksburgUSA

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