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Reflection in Higher Education: A Concept Analysis

Abstract

Despite the widespread adoption of reflective practices across many fields of study, a critical analysis of the concept of reflection and its application within higher education has been lacking. This article provides an examination of several major theoretical approaches to reflection including those of Dewey; Loughran; Mezirow; Seibert and Daudelin; Langer; Boud, Keogh and Walker; and Schön. Commonalties in terminology, definitions, antecedents, context, process, outcomes, and techniques to foster reflection are addressed. The implications of the findings for higher education are explained.

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Rogers, R.R. Reflection in Higher Education: A Concept Analysis. Innovative Higher Education 26, 37–57 (2001). https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1010986404527

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1010986404527

  • reflection
  • reflective practitioner
  • reflective practices