Facilitated Communication Since 1995: A Review of Published Studies

  • Mark P. Mostert

Abstract

Previous reviews of Facilitated Communication (FC) studies have clearly established that proponents' claims are largely unsubstantiated and that using FC as an intervention for communicatively impaired or noncommunicative individuals is not recommended. However, while FC is less prominent than in the recent past, investigations of the technique's efficacy continue. This review examines published FC studies since the previous major reviews by Jacobson, Mulick, and Schwartz (1995) and Simpson and Myles (1995a). Findings support the conclusions of previous reviews. Furthermore, this review critiques and discounts the claims of two studies purporting to offer empirical evidence of FC efficacy using control procedures.

facilitated communication autism literature review 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mark P. Mostert
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Early Childhood, Speech Language Pathology, & Special Education, Darden College of EducationOld Dominion UniversityNorfolk

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