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Mulberry-Silkworm Food Chain – A Templet to Assess Heavy Metal Mobility in Terrestrial Ecosystems

Abstract

Assessment of the food chain mobility of heavy metals inthe natural ecosystem receives more attention nowadays. Inthe present study, mulberry-silkworm food chain has beenfocused as a templet to assess the biomobility of heavymetals in soil-higher plant-insect hierarchy. Both in thecase of Cd and Cu treatments, higher mobility wasobserved in the level-1 (soil–root) followed by level-3(leaf–larva), level-4 (larvae–faecal) and level-2(root–leaf). Consequently, roots accumulated more amountsof Cd and Cu, with a limited transport to the leaves.Among the two metals (Cd and Cu) tested, in the plant,the transfer potential of Cd exceeds that of Cu. Whereasin the case of leaf–larval transfer, Cu precedes overCd. Accumulation of Cd and Cu in all the levels (1–4)tested showed a concentration dependent increase, except inthe level 4 (larva–faecal) of Cd treatment where adeclining trend was noticed.

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Correspondence to P. Senthilkumar.

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Prince, S., Senthilkumar, P. & Subburam, V. Mulberry-Silkworm Food Chain – A Templet to Assess Heavy Metal Mobility in Terrestrial Ecosystems. Environ Monit Assess 69, 231–238 (2001). https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1010715606097

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1010715606097

  • Cd
  • Cu
  • food chain mobility
  • heavy metals
  • mulberry
  • silkworm