The Urban Review

, Volume 33, Issue 2, pp 131–149 | Cite as

Telling Their Side of the Story: African-American Students' Perceptions of Culturally Relevant Teaching

  • Tyrone C. Howard

Abstract

An increasing amount of scholarship has documented the salience of culturally relevant teaching practices for ethnically and linguistically diverse students. However, research examining these students' perceptions and interpretations of these learning environments has been minimal at best. In this article, the author details the findings from a study that sought to assess African-American elementary students' interpretations of culturally relevant teachers within urban contexts. Student responses indicated that culturally relevant teaching strategies had a positive affect on student effort and engagement in class content and were consistent with the theoretical principles of culturally relevant pedagogy. The qualitative data revealed three key findings that students preferred in their learning environments (1) teachers who displayed caring bonds and attitudes toward them, (2) teachers who established community- and family-type classroom environments, and (3) teachers who made learning an entertaining and fun process.

African-American students culture pedagogy 

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc. 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tyrone C. Howard
    • 1
  1. 1.The Ohio State UniversityColumbus

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