Skip to main content

ATTRACTION OF A LEAF BEETLE (Oreina cacaliae) TO DAMAGED HOST PLANTS

Abstract

Early in spring, just after the snow melts, the leaf beetle Oreina cacaliae feeds on flowers of Petasites paradoxus. Later in spring they switch to their principle host plant Adenostyles alliariae. The attractiveness of short- and long-term damaged host plants was studied in a wind tunnel. The spring host P. paradoxus was more attractive to the beetles after it had been damaged overnight by conspecifics or artificially, but not when the plants were damaged half an hour before the wind-tunnel experiments. Contrary to P. paradoxus, the principle host plant, A. alliariae was more attractive shortly after an attack by conspecifics (half an hour before the experiment) compared to a undamaged plant, but lost its increased attractiveness when damaged overnight. The enhanced attraction of damaged plants was longer lasting in the spring host P. paradoxus than in the main host A. alliariae. Volatiles emitted by host plants were collected and gas chromatographic analyses of the odors collected showed qualitative and quantitative differences between damaged and undamaged plants. Among the volatiles recorded, green leaf volatiles and mono- and sesquiterpenes dominated. In overnight damaged P. paradoxus plants with an enhanced attractiveness, limonene was emitted in higher amounts. In freshly damaged A. alliariae leaves, more α-humulene and germacrene D were emitted compared to (E,E)-α-farnesene, whereas in the less attractive A. alliariae plants, more (E,E)-α-farnesene was emitted compared to α-humulene and germacrene D. In the field, the long lasting attraction of flowering P. paradoxus early in the season may facilitate mating in O. cacaliae after a successful overwintering.

This is a preview of subscription content, access via your institution.

REFERENCES

  • BOLTER, C. J., DICKE, M. V. LOON, J. J. A. VISSER J. H., and POSTHUMUS, M. A. 1997. Attraction of Colorado potato beetle to herbivore-damaged plants during herbivory and after its termination. J. Chem. Ecol.23:1003-1023.

    Google Scholar 

  • BORDEN, J. H. 1984. Semiochemical-mediated aggregation and dispersion in the Coleoptera, pp. 123-149, inT. Lewis (ed.). Insect Communication.Academic Press, Orlando, Florida.

    Google Scholar 

  • DOBLER, S., and ROWELL-RAHIER, M. 1994. Production of cardenolides versus sequestration of pyrrolizidine alkaloids in larvae of Oreinaspecies (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae). J. Chem. Ecol.20:555-568.

    Google Scholar 

  • DOMEK, J. M., and JOHNSON, D. T. 1988. Demonstration of semiochemically induced aggregation in the green June beetle, Cotinis nitida(L.) (Coleoptera, Scarabaeidae). Environ. Entomol.17:147-149.

    Google Scholar 

  • EGGENBERGER, F., and ROWELL-RAHIER, M. 1991. Chemical defence and genetic variation. Naturwissenschaften78:317-320.

    Google Scholar 

  • EGGENBERGER, F., and ROWELL-RAHIER, M. 1993. Physiological sources of variation in chemical defense of Oreina gloriosa(Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae). J. Chem. Ecol.19:395-410.

    Google Scholar 

  • EHMKE, A., ROWELL-RAHIER, M. PASTEELS J. M., and HARTMANN, T. 1991. Sequestration of ingested [14C]senecionine N-oxide in the exocrine defensive secretions of chrysomelid beetles. J. Chem. Ecol.17:2367-2379.

    Google Scholar 

  • HARARI, A. R., BEN-YAKIR D., and ROSEN, D. 1994. Mechanism of aggregation behavior in Maladera matridaArgaman (Coleoptera: Scarabidae). J. Chem. Ecol.20:361-371.

    Google Scholar 

  • HEATH, R. R., and MANUKIAN, A. 1992. Development and evaluation of systems to collect volatile semiochemicals from insects and plants using a charcoal-infused medium for air purification. J. Chem. Ecol.18:1209-1126.

    Google Scholar 

  • JONES, O. T. 1985. Chemical mediation of insect behavior, pp. 311-373, in D. H. Hutson and T. R. Roberts (eds.). Progress in Pesticide Biochemistry and Toxicology, Vol. 5, Insecticides. Wiley, New York.

    Google Scholar 

  • KALBERER, N. M. 2000. Host-plant recognition, dispersal and its influence on reproduction in the alpine leaf beetle Oreina cacaliae.PhD thesis. University of Neuchâtel, Neuchâtel, Switzerland.

    Google Scholar 

  • LOHSE, G. A., and LUCHT, W. H. 1994. page 73, inGoecke and Evers (ed.). Die Käfer Mitteleuropas14. Krefeld.

  • LOUGHRIN, J. H., POTTER D. A., and HAMILTON-KEMP, T. R. 1995. Volatile Compounds induced by Herbivory act as Aggregation Kairomones for the Japanese beetle (Popillia japonicaNewman). J. Chem. Ecol.21:1457-1467.

    Google Scholar 

  • MILLER, J. R., and STRICKLER, K. L. 1984. Finding and accepting host plants, inW. J. Bell and R. T. Cardé (eds.). Chemical Ecology of Insects.Chapman and Hall, New York. pp. 127-155.

    Google Scholar 

  • PARE, P.W., and TUMLINSON, J. H. 1997. De novo biosynthesis of volatiles induced by insect herbivory in cotton plants. Plant Physiol.114:1161-1167.

    PubMed  Google Scholar 

  • PASTEELS, J. M., ROWELL-RAHIER, M., BRAEKMAN, J.-C., and DALOZE, D. 1994. Chemical defense of adult leaf beetles updated, pp. 298-301, inP. Jolivet, M. Cox, and E. Petitpierre (eds.). Novel Aspects of the Biology of ChrysomelidaeKluwer, Dordrecht.

    Google Scholar 

  • PENG, C., and WEISS, M. J. 1992. Evidence of an aggregation pheromone in the flea beetle, Phyllotreta cruciferae(Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae). J. Chem. Ecol.18:875-884.

    Google Scholar 

  • SAXENA, K., and GOYAL, N. S. 1978. Host-plant relations of the citrus butterfly Papilio demolusL.: Orientation and ovipositional responses Entomol. Exp. Appli.24:1-10.

    Google Scholar 

  • SCUTAREANU, P., DRUKKER, B., BRUIN, J., POSTHUMUS, M. A., and SABELIS, M. W. 1997. Volatiles from Psylla-infested pear trees and their possible involvement in attracting of anthocorid predators. J. Chem. Ecol.23:2241-2260.

    Google Scholar 

  • STEVENS, L., and CAULEY, D. E. M. 1989. Mating prior to over-wintering in the important willow leaf beetle, Plagiodera versicolora(Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae). Ecol. Entomol.14:219-223.

    Google Scholar 

  • TAKABAYASHI, J., DICKE M., and POSTHUMUS, M. A. 1994. Volatile herbivore-induced terpenoids in plant-mite interactions: Variation caused by biotic and abiotic factors. J. Chem. Ecol.20:1329-1354.

    Google Scholar 

  • TURLINGS, T. C. J., TUMLINSON J. H., and LEWIS, W. J. 1990. Exploitation of herbivore-induced plant odours by host-seeking parasitic wasps. Science250:1251-1253.

    Google Scholar 

  • TURLINGS, T. C. J., BERNASCONI, M., BERTOSSA, R., BIGLER, F., CALOZ, G., and DORN, S. 1998. The induction of volatile emissions in maize by three herbivore species with different feeding habits: possible consequences for their natural enemies. Biol. Control11:122-129.

    Google Scholar 

  • VISSER, J. H., and AVé, D. A. 1978. General green leaf volatiles in the olfactory orientation of the Colorado beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata. Entomol. Exp. Appl.24:538-549.

    Google Scholar 

  • VISSER, J. H., and NIELSON, J. K. 1977. Specificity in the olfactory orientation of the CPB. Entomol. Exp. Appl.21:14-22.

    Google Scholar 

  • VISSER, J. H., STRATEN S. V., and MAARSE, H. 1979. Isolation and identification of volatiles in the foliage of potato, Solanum tuberosuma host plant of the Colorado beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata. J. Chem. Ecol.5:13-25.

    Google Scholar 

  • YAMASAKI, T., SATO, M., and SAKOGUCHI, H. 1997. Germacrene D: Masking substance of attractants for the cerambycid beetle, Monochamus alternatus(Hope). Appl. Entomol. Zool.32:423-429.

    Google Scholar 

Download references

Author information

Authors and Affiliations

Authors

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

About this article

Cite this article

Kalberer, N.M., Turlings, T.C.J. & Rahier, M. ATTRACTION OF A LEAF BEETLE (Oreina cacaliae) TO DAMAGED HOST PLANTS. J Chem Ecol 27, 647–661 (2001). https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1010389500009

Download citation

  • Issue Date:

  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1010389500009

  • Olfaction
  • behavior
  • wind-tunnel
  • gaschromatography
  • Coleoptera
  • Chrysomelidae
  • Oreina cacaliae