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Polynesian Folklore: An Alternative to Plastic Toys

Abstract

Because folklore has the capability to teach and to preserve the thoughts, feelings, and beliefs of a people, suggestions are offered for using folklore to deepen children's understanding of Polynesian culture. Maori nature fables, along with error/punishment stories involving the woman or man on the moon, represent the instructive function. Tales and legends preserving cultural history are represented by a folk story reflecting values and customs of everyday life, accounts of legendary monsters reflecting cultural hopes and fears, and heroic tales of the popular demigod Maui. Specific stories are reviewed, juvenile collections are referenced, and classroom activities are offered.

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Black, S., Wright, T. & Erickson, L. Polynesian Folklore: An Alternative to Plastic Toys. Children's Literature in Education 32, 125–137 (2001). https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1010386512636

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  • folklore
  • folktales
  • Polynesia
  • cultural history
  • cultural values