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Bone Allografts: Past, Present and Future

Abstract

Bone allograft transplantation has been performed in humans for more than one hundred and twenty years. During the first one hundred years (1880–1980), the major problem in bone allograft transplantation was availability. Most of the bone grafts used during this time were autografts. Allografts were not available due to a lack of legislation protecting procurers and processers. In addition, surgical procedures requiring allografts were not being performed. During the next twenty years (1980–2000), as allografis began to be used, the major issue was safety. Diseases transmitted during this period included AIDS and hepatitis. Avoidance of disease transmission became paramount. Sensitive blood tests and extensive efforts by bone banks to develop ways to clean. bone and clear it of infectious agents helped provide safe transplants. With concerns of availability and safety receding, the major issue in the future (2000–? ) will be the efficacy of the transplant. How allograft bone remodels in the host, how it incorporates and heals to host bone and how it integrates with the host skeleton will be the most important concerns of bone bankers and tissue transplant surgeons. Future research efforts will be applied to bone allograft transplantation to ensure that bone transplants heal quickly and sufficiently to be able to function as part of the weight-bearing skeletal system.

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Tomford, W.W. Bone Allografts: Past, Present and Future. Cell Tissue Banking 1, 105–109 (2000). https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1010158731885

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1010158731885

Keywords

  • Hepatitis
  • Research Effort
  • Bone Graft
  • Blood Test
  • Bone Remodel