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The First Known Invasion of a Free-living Marine Flatworm

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Correspondence to Brian R. Rivest.

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Rivest, B.R., Coyer, J. & Tyler, S. The First Known Invasion of a Free-living Marine Flatworm. Biological Invasions 1, 393–394 (1999). https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1010076418671

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1010076418671

  • acoel
  • exotic species
  • flatworm
  • Gulf of Maine
  • invasions
  • Platyhelminthes
  • Turbellaria