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The life history and host range of Ectagagarcia, a biological control agent for Lantana camra and L. montevidensis in Australia

Abstract

The life cycle and host specificity of Ectaga garcia were investigated. Moths emerge in the morning and are inactive during the day. Eggs are laid and larvae feed on the undersurface of leaves of Lantana camara and L. montevidensis. Larvae spin protective cocoons from which they feed and in which they pupate. Development from egg to adult takes approximately 48 days. Forty-five plant species were tested to determine host specificity. Females laid eggs only on L. camara and L. montevidensis. In no-choice trials, neonate larvae fed but failed to complete development on nine test species. E. garcia was subsequently approved for release in Australia.

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Day, M., Willson, B. & Latimer, K. The life history and host range of Ectagagarcia, a biological control agent for Lantana camra and L. montevidensis in Australia. BioControl 43, 325–338 (1998). https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1009922310745

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1009922310745

  • creeping lantana
  • host specificity
  • leaf-roller
  • Lepidoptera
  • Oecophoridae
  • phytophagous
  • varietal preference