Nutrient Cycling in Agroecosystems

, Volume 58, Issue 1–3, pp 55–63 | Cite as

A Four-Year Record of Methane Emissions from Irrigated Rice Fields in the Beijing Region of China

  • Z.Y. Wang
  • Y.C. Xu
  • Z. Li
  • Y.X. Guo
  • R. Wassmann
  • H.U. Neue
  • R.S. Lantin
  • L.V. Buendia
  • Y.P. Ding
  • Z.Z. Wang
Article

Abstract

Methane (CH4) emissions from irrigated rice fields were measured using an automatic sampling-measuring system with a closed chamber method in 1995–98. Average emission rates ranged from 11 to 364 mg m−2 d−1 depending on season, water regime, and fertilizer application. Crop management typical for this region (i.e., midseason drainage and organic/mineral fertilizer application) resulted in emission of 279 and 139 mg CH4 m−2 d−1 in 1995 and 1997, respectively. This roughly corresponds to emissions observed in other rice-growing areas of China. Emissions were very intense during the tillering stage, which accounted for 85% of total annual emission, but these were suppressed by low temperature in the late stage of the season. The local irrigation practice of drying at mid-season reduced emission rates by 23%, as compared with continuous flooding. Further reduction of CH4 emissions could be attained by (1) alternate flooding/drying, (2) shifting the drainage period to an earlier stage, or (3) splitting drainage into two phases (of which one is in an earlier stage). Emission rates were extremely sensitive to organic amendments: seasonal emissions from fields treated with pig manure were 15–35 times higher than those treated with ammonium sulfate in the corresponding season. On the basis of identical carbon inputs, CH4 emission potential varied among organic amendments. Rice straw had higher emissions than cattle manure but lower emissions than pig manure. Use of cultivar Zhongzhuo (modern japonica) reduced CH4 emission by 56% and 50%, in 1995 and 1997, respectively, as compared with Jingyou (japonica hybrid) and Zhonghua (tall japonica). The results give evidence that CH4 emissions from rice fields in northern China can be reduced by a package of crop management options without affecting yields.

methane emission rice fields water management organic manure rice cultivar organic amendment mitigation options 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Agricultural Year Book of China (1995) Agricultural Press, Beijing, ChinaGoogle Scholar
  2. Bolle HJ, Seiler W & Bolin B (1986) Other greenhouse gas and aerosols. In: The Greenhouse Effect. Climate Change and Ecosystems, pp 157–198, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  3. Cai ZC, Xu H, Tsuruta H, Zhang HH & Jin JS (1994) Estimate of methane emission from rice paddy fields in Taihu region, China. Pedosphere 4: 297–306Google Scholar
  4. Cai ZC, Yan XY, Xu H, Tsuruta H, Yagi K & Minami K (1995) Effect of nitrogen form on methane emission from rice paddy field. Acta Pedol Sin 32 (supp):136–143Google Scholar
  5. Cai ZC (1997) A category for estimate of CH4 emission from rice paddy fields in China. Nutr Cycling Agroecosyst 49:171–179Google Scholar
  6. Chen DZ, Wang MX, Shangguan XJ, Huang J, Rasmussen RA & Khalil MAK (1993a) Methane emission from rice fields in southeast of China. Adv Earth Sci 8(5):47–54 (in Chinese)Google Scholar
  7. Chen ZL, Li DB, Shao KS & Wang BJ (1993b) Features of methane emission from rice paddy fields in Beijing and Nanjing. Chemosphere 26:239–245Google Scholar
  8. IPCC – Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (1992). In: Houghton JT, Callander BA & Varney SK (eds) Climate Change-The Supplementary Report to the IPCC Scientific Assessment, 200 p, Cambridge, UKGoogle Scholar
  9. Kern JS, Gong ZT, Zhang GL, Zhuo HZ & Luo GB (1997) Spatial analysis of methane emissions from paddy soils in China and the potential for emission reduction. Nutr Cycling Agroecosyst 49:181–195Google Scholar
  10. Khalil MAK, Rasmussen RA, Wang MX & Ren LX (1991) Methane emissions from rice fields in China. Environ Sci Technol 25:979–981Google Scholar
  11. Lu WF, Chen W, Duan BW, Guo WM, Lu Y, Lantin RS, Wassmann R & Neue HU (2000) Methane emission and mitigation options in irrigated rice fields in Southeast China. Nutr Cycling Agroecosyst, this issueGoogle Scholar
  12. Neue HU (1993) Methane emission from rice fields. Biosci 43:466–474Google Scholar
  13. Rasmussen RA & Khalil MAK (1986) Atmospheric trace gases: Trends and distribution over the last decade. Science 32:1623–1624Google Scholar
  14. Sass RL (1995) Mitigation of methane emission from irrigated rice agriculture. Global Change Newsl 22:4–5Google Scholar
  15. Tao Z & Du DD (1998) Methane emission from Paddy fields in different regions and the control measures. Agric Environ Prot 17:1–7Google Scholar
  16. Thompson AM & Cicerone RJ (1986) Possible perturbations to atmospheric CO, CH4 and OH. J Geophys Res 91 (D): 10858–10864Google Scholar
  17. Wang B, Xu Y, Wang Z, Li Z, Guo Y, Shao K & Chen Z (1999) Methane emissions from ricefields as affected by organic amendment, water regime, crop establishment, and rice cultivar. Environ Monit Assess 57:213–228Google Scholar
  18. Wang M.X., Dai AG, Shen RX, Schütz H, Rennenberg H, Seiler W & Wu HB (1990) Methane emission from a Chinese rice paddy field. Acta Meteorol Sin 4:265–275.Google Scholar
  19. Wassmann R, Schütz H, Papen H, Rennenberg H, Seiler W, Dai AG, Shen RX, Shangguan XJ & Wang MX (1993a) Quantification of methane emissions from Chinese rice fields (Zhejiang Province) as influenced by fertilizer treatment. Biogeochemistry 20:83–101Google Scholar
  20. Wassmann R, Wang MX, Shangguan XJ, Xie XL, Shen RX, Papen H, Rennenberg H & Seiler W (1993b). First records of a field experiment on fertilizer effect on methane emission from rice fields in Human province (PR China). Geophys Res Lett 20:2071–2074Google Scholar
  21. Wassmann R, Shangguan XJ, Tölg M, Cheng DX, Wang MX, Papen H, Rennenberg H & Seiler W (1996) Spatial and seasonal distribution of organic amendments affecting methane emission from Chinese rice fields. Biol Fertil Soils 22:191–195Google Scholar
  22. Wassmann R, Neue HU, Lantin RS, Buendia LV & Rennenberg H (2000a) Characterization of methane emissions from rice fields in Asia. 1. Comparison among field sites in five countries. Nutr Cycling Agroecosyst, this issueGoogle Scholar
  23. Wassmann R, Neue HU, Lantin RS, Makarim K, Chareonsilp N, Buendia LV & Rennenberg H (2000b) Characterization of methane emissions from rice fields in Asia. 2. Differences among irrigated, rainfed and deepwater ecosystems. Nutr Cycling Agroecosyst, this issueGoogle Scholar
  24. Yao H, Zhuang Y & Chen ZL (1996) Estimation of methane emission from rice paddies in mainland China. Global Biogeochem Cycles 10:641–649Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Z.Y. Wang
    • 1
  • Y.C. Xu
    • 1
  • Z. Li
    • 1
  • Y.X. Guo
    • 1
  • R. Wassmann
    • 2
    • 3
  • H.U. Neue
    • 2
    • 4
  • R.S. Lantin
    • 2
  • L.V. Buendia
    • 2
  • Y.P. Ding
    • 5
  • Z.Z. Wang
    • 5
  1. 1.Institute of Crop Breeding and CultivationChinese Academy of Agricultural SciencesBeijingChina
  2. 2.International Rice Research InstituteLos Banos, LagunaPhilippines
  3. 3.Fraunhofer Institute for Atmospheric Environmental ResearchGarmisch-PartenkirchenGermany
  4. 4.UFZ-Center for Environmental ResearchHalleGermany
  5. 5.Institute of Crop Breeding and CultivationChinese Academy of Agricultural SciencesBeijingChina

Personalised recommendations