Nutrient Cycling in Agroecosystems

, Volume 58, Issue 1–3, pp 65–73 | Cite as

Methane Emissions and Mitigation Options in Irrigated Rice Fields in Southeast China

  • W.F. Lu
  • W. Chen
  • B.W. Duan
  • W.M. Guo
  • Y. Lu
  • R.S. Lantin
  • R. Wassmann
  • H.U. Neue

Abstract

Methane (CH4) emissions from rice fields were monitored in Hangzhou, China, from 1995 to 1998 by an automatic measurement system based on the "closed chamber technique." The impacts of water management, organic inputs, and cultivars on CH4 emission were evaluated. Under the local crop management system, seasonal emissions ranging from 53 to 557 kg CH4 ha−1 were observed with an average value of 182 kg CH4 ha−1. Methane emission patterns differed among rice seasons and were generally governed by temperature changes. Emissions showed an increasing trend in early rice and a decreasing trend in late rice. In a single rice field, CH4 emissions increased during the first half of the growing period and decreased during the second half. Drainage was a major modifier of seasonal CH4 emission pattern. The local practice of midseason drainage reduced CH4 emissions by 44% as compared with continuous flooding; CH4 emissions could further be reduced by intermittent irrigation, yielding a 30% reduction as compared with midseason drainage. The incorporation of organic amendments promoted CH4 emission, but the amount of emission varied with the type of organic material and application method. Methane emission from fields where biogas residue was applied was 10–16% lower than those given the same quantity (based on N content) of pig manure. Rice straw applied before the winter fallow period reduced CH4 emission by 11% as compared with that obtained from fields to which the same amount of rice straw was applied during field preparation. Broadcasting of straw instead of incorporation into the soil showed less emission (by 12%). Cultivar selection influenced CH4 emission, but the differences were smaller than those among organic treatments and water regimes. Modifications in water regime and organic inputs were identified as promising mitigation options in southeast China.

midseason drainage pig manure rice straw biogas residues cultivars winter fallow dissolved methane 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Adhya TK, Rath AK, Gupta PK, Rao VR, Das SN, Parida KM, Parashar DC & Sethunathan N (1994) Methane emission from flooded rice fields under irrigated conditions. Biol Fertil Soils 18:245–248Google Scholar
  2. Cai ZC, Xu H, Zhang HH & Jin JS (1994) Estimate of methane emission from rice paddy fields in Tai-hu region,China. Pedosphere 4(4):297–306Google Scholar
  3. Cai ZC, Yan XY, Tsuruta H, Yagi K & Minama K (1995a) Spatial variation of methane emission from rice paddy fields in hilly area. Acta Pedol Sin 32 (supp.):136–143 (In Chinese) Google Scholar
  4. Cai ZC, Yan XY, Xu H, Tsuruta H, Yagi K & Minama K (1995b) Effect of nitrogen form on CH4 emission from rice paddy field. Acta Pedol Sin 32 (supp.):151–159 (In Chinese) Google Scholar
  5. Cicerone RJ & Shetter JD (1981) Sources of atmospheric methane: measurements in rice paddies and a discussion. J Geophys Res 86:7203–7209Google Scholar
  6. Cicerone RJ & Oremland RS (1988) Biogeochemical aspects of atmospheric methane. Global Biogeochem Cycles 2: 299–327Google Scholar
  7. Dlugokencky E, Steele P, Lang PM, Tans P & Masaire K (1994) The growth rate and distribution of atmospheric methane. J Geophys Res 99:17021–17043Google Scholar
  8. GEIA--Global Emission Inventory Activity (1993) Report on the 3rd workshop, Amersford, 31 Jan-2 Feb 1993, A.F. Bowman (ed) Bilthoven, The Netherlands, 83 pGoogle Scholar
  9. Holzapfel-Pschorn A, Conrad R & Seiler W (1985) Production, oxidation, and emission of methane in rice paddies. FEMS Microbiol Ecol 31:149–158Google Scholar
  10. Husin YA, Murdiyarso D, Khalil MAK, Rasmussen RA, Shearer MJ, Sabiham S, Sunar A & Adijuwana H (1995) Methane flux from Indonesian wetland rice: the effects of water management and rice variety. Chemosphere 31: 3153–3180Google Scholar
  11. IPCC – Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (1996) Climate Change 1995. The Science of Climate Change. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK, 572 pGoogle Scholar
  12. IPCC – Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (1997) Guidelines for national greenhouse gas inventories. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UKGoogle Scholar
  13. IRRI – International Rice Research Institute (1993a) Rice Research in a Time of Change. Manila, Philippines, 79 pGoogle Scholar
  14. IRRI – International Rice Research Institute (1993b) IRRI Rice Almanac. Manila, Philippines, 142 pGoogle Scholar
  15. IRRI – International Rice Research Institute (1995) World Rice Statistics 1993/1994. Manila, Philippines, 260 pGoogle Scholar
  16. Khalil MAK & Rasmussen RA (1991) Methane emissions from rice fields in China. Environ. Sci Technol 25:979–981Google Scholar
  17. Khalil MAK & Shearer MJ (1993) Atmospheric methane: sources, sinks and role in global change. Chemosphere 26:201–217Google Scholar
  18. Kimura (1994) Effect of intermittent irrigation on methane emission from an Indonesian paddy field. Soil Sci Plant Nutr 40:609–615Google Scholar
  19. Lu Y, Wassmann R, Neue HU & Huang C (1999) Impacts of phosphorus supply on root exudation, aerenchyma formation and methane emission of rice plants. Biogeochemistry (in press)Google Scholar
  20. Neue HU & Sass RL (1994) Trace gas emissions from rice fields. In Prinn RG (ed) Global Atmospheric-Biospheric Chemistry, pp 119–146, Plenum Press, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  21. Neue HU & Sass RL (1998) The budget of methane from rice fields. IGACtivities 12:3–11Google Scholar
  22. Neue HU, Lantin RS, Wassmann R, Aduna JB, Alberto MCR, & Andales MJF (1994) Methane emission from rice soils of the Philippines. In: Minami K, Mosier A & Sass RL (eds) CH4 and N2O: Global Emissions and Controls from Rice Fields and Other Agricultural and Industrial Sources, pp. 55–77, Tsukuba, JapanGoogle Scholar
  23. Neue HU, Wassmann R, Kludze HK, Wang B & Lantin RS (1997) Factors and processes controlling methane emissions from rice fields. Nutr Cycling Agroecosyst 49:111–117Google Scholar
  24. Rennenberg H, Wassmann R, Papen H & Seiler W (1992) Trace gas emission in rice cultivation. Ecol Bull 42:164–173Google Scholar
  25. Sass RL, Fisher FM, Harcombe PA & Turner FT (1990) Methane production and emission in a Texas rice field. Global Biogeochem Cycles 4:47–68Google Scholar
  26. Sass RL, Fisher FM, Wang YB, Turner FT & Jund MF (1992) Methane emission from rice fields: the effect of floodwater management. Global Biogeochem Cycles 6:249–262Google Scholar
  27. Schütz H, Holzapfel-Pschorn A, Conrad R, Rennenberg H & Seiler W (1989) A three-year continuous record on the influence of daytime season and fertilizer treatment on methane emission rates from an Italian rice paddy field. J Geophys Res 94:16405–16416Google Scholar
  28. Seiler W, Holzapfel-Pschorn A, Conrad R & Scharffe D (1984) Methane emission from rice paddies. J Atmos Chem 1:241–268Google Scholar
  29. Wang MX, Dai A, Shangguan X, Ren L, Shen R, H Schütz, Seiler W, Rasmussen RA & Khalil MAK (1994) Sources of methane in China. In: Minami K, Mosier A & Sass RL (eds) CH4 and N2O: Global Emissions and Controls from Rice Fields and Other Agricultural & Industrial Sources, pp. 9–26, Tsukuba, JapanGoogle Scholar
  30. Wang MX, Li J & Zheng XH (1998) Methane emission and mechanisms of methane production, oxidation, transportation in the rice fields. Sci Atmos Sin 22(4):600–612 (In Chinese) Google Scholar
  31. Wassmann R, Neue HU, Lantin RL, Aduna JB, Alberto MC, Andales MJ, Tan MJ, Denier van der Gon HAC, Hoffmann H, Papen H, Rennenberg H & Seiler W (1994) Temporal patterns of methane emissions from wetland ricefields treated by different modes of N application. J Geophys Res 99:16457–16462Google Scholar
  32. Wassmann R, Neue HU, Lantin RS, Javellana MJ, Diego R, Lignes VE, Hoffmann H, Papen H & Rennenberg H (1995) Methane emissions from rainfed rice. In: Fragile Lives in Fragile Ecosystems, pp 217–225, International Rice Research Institute, Manila, PhilippinesGoogle Scholar
  33. Wassmann R, Neue HU, Bueno C, Lantin RS, Alberto MCR, Buendia LV, Bronson K, Papen H & Rennenberg H (1998) Methane production capacities of different rice soils derived from inherent and exogenous substrates. Plant Soil 203:227–237Google Scholar
  34. Wassmann R, Neue HU, Lantin RS, Buendia LV & Rennenberg H (2000a) Characterization of methane emissions from rice fields in Asia. 1. Comparison among field sites in five countries. Nutr Cycling Agroecosys, this issueGoogle Scholar
  35. Wassmann R, Neue HU, Lantin RS, Makarim K, Chareonsilp N, Buendia LV & Rennenberg H (2000b) Characterization of methane emissions from rice fields in Asia. 2. Differences among irrigated, rainfed, and deepwater rice. Nutr Cycling Agroecosyst, this issueGoogle Scholar
  36. Yagi K, Tsuruta H, Kanda K & Minami K (1996) Effect of water management on methane emission from a Japanese rice paddy field: automated methane monitoring. Global Biogeochem Cycles 10:255–267Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • W.F. Lu
    • 1
  • W. Chen
    • 1
  • B.W. Duan
    • 1
  • W.M. Guo
    • 1
  • Y. Lu
    • 1
    • 2
  • R.S. Lantin
    • 2
  • R. Wassmann
    • 1
    • 3
  • H.U. Neue
    • 1
    • 4
  1. 1.China National Rice Research Institute, HangzhouZhejiangPeople's Republic of China
  2. 2.International Rice Research InstituteMakati CityPhilippines
  3. 3.Fraunhofer Institute for Atmospheric Environmental ResearchGarmisch-PartenkirchenGermany
  4. 4.Department of Soil SciencesUFZ-Center for Environmental ResearchHalleGermany

Personalised recommendations